Thursday, September 7, 2017

Can you use Deprecated Functions?

Hey guys, I am making a few tutorials but all are in progress right now. Hope to publish them this weekend. Anyways, as a frequent StackOverflow visitor, I often read programmers wanting to change the functions they used that are deprecated. From their postings, I get that many programmers think that deprecated means "cut off" and therefore cannot be used indefinitely. This is, false.

Let us take a look at the meaning of the word first.


Basically, it means disapproved (or in layman terms, not advised to be used). It is not the same as totally cannot be used in which case the word is BANNED. Deprecated is not banned. It is only advisable not to use the function. BUT YOU CAN STILL USE IT.

In iOS developer terms, you can surely use a deprecated function, but you must start thinking/planning/coding of the new function to replace it in 4-5 years time. Deprecated functions normally are supported for a long time before they are removed. This is because often, Apple creates new and better frameworks for a thing. But there will be many apps that rely on that framework that are already in the App Store. So to immediately ban a function, is an act of oppression.

For example, NSURLConnection. It was introduced in iOS2.0. It's successor, the NSURLSession was introduced in iOS7.0. So since iOS7.0, NSURLConnection is therefore flagged as deprecated. But can you still use it in iOS10? YES IT STILL WORKS. In iOS11? Nobody knows (except the beta users right now). Given 3 versions of iOS has passed, you oughta change it by now.

But if it was *just* deprecated in iOS9 for example, no sweat because that function will definitely be available even in iOS11. So if you're doing a quick update of your apps, very old functions that are deprecated (like the ones intro'd in iOS2.0), should be replaced. But if the deprecation appear in iOS8 or 9, you're likely safe to leave it as it is for now.

Hope this post has been beneficial. Happy coding!


Saturday, July 8, 2017

How to: Basic of XCode Methods & Functions in Objective-C

Why ObjC?

Cause we're oldskool! :D


INTRODUCTION

When we start to code, what we need to do is write methods on top of the already available delegates (namely the View Lifecycles delegates like viewDidLoad or viewDidLayoutSubviews). A typical method that we quickly create is IBActions. These are automatically created when you drag an outlet in Storyboard to your header file.


-(IBAction)aButtonWasClicked:(id)sender {
  // your button was clicked by user
}

The aButtonWasClicked: is the name of the method. Note that I include the semicolon at the end. This indicates there is a parameter to be supplied to the method. So if you want to call this method elsewhere programatically, you need to write:

Friday, April 28, 2017

How To: Seriously Plan and Design an iOS Apps or Games

Hey whatsapp? (see what I did there? XD)

All these while we've been playing with XCode and making fun things without much care of how our app's structure looks like.



The thing about making an app/software, there are so many ways to do one thing. So many ways to code a feature. But if you are serious in making apps, you need to consider your app carefully and thoroughly, so that updating the app won't be a pain in the a$$ in the future. This is more so, when making your own app, or an app for a customer that may be requested to be updated in the future. The overall structure and back bone of the app needs to be as good and as organized as possible. Otherwise you'll end up crazy, trying to make sense of things in the app or when you want to add a new feature to the app.

So what you should do? I now will outline the necessary steps and points for you to consider when making an app.

Sunday, February 26, 2017

How To: Create Undo and Redo in a Drawing App

Hi guys.

I want to share how to create undo and redo in a drawing app. I tried using NSUndoManager for this, but it doesn't work. Why? I don't know. When something don't work, I tried for a bit, and if I have no more idea to try and work it out, I simply abandon the idea and try something else totally. There is no point lingering on something that you simply do not know.

The way to implement undo and redo is quite simple really. You just detect user's end stroke, and then save that drawn image into a MutableArray. This will eat memory a bit especially if you have a very big image. Alternatively you can simply store the drawn image in the TMP folder of your app sandbox use names like "undo0.png, undo1.png, undo2.png...". Have a global undo index variable to keep track of the undo/redo steps. When undoing, you -1 to the index, and load the image based on this index number. And when redoing, you +1 to the index, and load that image.

Something like this:


-(void)undo {
undoIndex -= 1;
NSString *imageName = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%undold.png",undoIndex];
yourImage.image =  [self loadImageFromTMP:imageName];
}

-(void)redo {
undoIndex += 1;
NSString *imageName = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%undold.png",undoIndex];
yourImage.image =  [self loadImageFromTMP:imageName];
}


Of course, you have to handle the undoIndex limits (>=0 and <maxUndolevel). Simple right? Kthxbai.